High Resolution

View Examples Of High Resolution Imagery

Click on the expand button for a larger view of each image. You can also right-click and save any of the examples to your computer for a full resolution view.

Our High Resolution Sensors

Sensor NameSensor TypeSpectral BandsSensor ResolutionPotential Coverage Area
Digital AerialAirplaneNatural color
CIR
4-band MS
15-cm
30-cm
60-cm
Continental US +
Western Europe
WorldView-4SatellitePan
4-band MS
31-cm
1.24-m
Global
WorldView-3SatellitePan
8-band MS
8-band SWIR
31-cm
1.24-m
3.71-m
Global
GeoEye-1SatellitePan
4-band MS
41-cm
1.65-m
Global
WorldView-2SatellitePan
8-band MS
46-cm
1.85-m
Global
WorldView-1SatellitePan50-cmGlobal
KOMPSAT-3ASatellitePan
4-band MS
55-cm
2.2-m
Global
QuickbirdSatellitePan
4-band MS
60-cm
2.4-m
Global
Pléiades 1A/1B2 satellite
constellation
Pan
4-band MS
70-cm
2.8-m
Global
KOMPSAT-3SatellitePan
4-band MS
70-cm
2.8-m
Global
EROS BSatellitePan70-cmGlobal
Deimos-2SatellitePansharpened
Pan
4-band MS
75-cm
1-m
4-m
Global
IKONOSSatellitePan
4-band MS
80-cm
3.2-m
Global
GaoFen-2SatellitePan
4-band MS
81-cm
3.24-m
Global
TripleSatSatellitePan
4-band MS
1-m
4-m
Global
KOMPSAT-2SatellitePan
4-band MS
1-m
4-m
Global
OverviewTasking vs Archive

What exactly does high resolution imagery really mean? While the term is used frequently, it is rarely defined. Here at Apollo Mapping, we define high resolution imagery as having 1 meter (m) or better resolution.

For most high resolution sensors, the panchromatic (or black and white) band has 1-meter or better resolution. If the sensor collects multispectral (or red, green, blue, etc.) data simultaneously, which is more common than not, these images have a resolution which is two or four times that of the panchromatic band.

How long will it take to receive my imagery? We get this question all the time. The answer is that it depends on a few variables, but one of the main factors is whether we can find your imagery in an archive or if we will have to place a tasking order.

Tasking Order

A tasking order is an on-demand service whereby clients define a custom polygon on the planet to be imaged by the next available high resolution satellite. The time to collect this area of interest is controlled by local weather conditions and competition from surrounding tasking orders.

Archive Order

An archive order relies on a historic database of high resolution imagery with a specific time/date stamp and known cloud cover. Clients are able to browse available data with the assistance of Apollo Mapping to determine the best imagery for their intended applications.