Posted on November 1st, 2022

The Pléiades 1 – Pléiades Neo Stadium of the Month – Lambeau Field

In October, we looked at an innovative football stadium in The Big Peach, and for this month’s edition of the Pléiades 1 – Pléiades Neo Stadium of the Month we’re checking out the home of the NFL’s Green Bay Packers, Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

AN October 24, 2022 UPDATE ON THE LAUNCH OF THE 30-cm Pléiades Neo CONSTELLATION!

As of now, plans are on track for Pléiades Neo 5 and 6 to launch November 23, 2022 with expected commercialization of the data by the end of 2022 or early 2023. When fully operational, the 30-cm Pléiades Neo constellation will collect some 2 million square kilometers of imagery per day with the ability to image locations twice per day.


A 30-cm color image of Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA collected on August 4, 2022 by Pléiades Neo 3; and then a snowy, football-season 50-cm Pléiades 1B image of the same stadium collected on January 26, 2022. These images have custom processing and color balancing applied by Apollo Mapping. PLÉIADES © CNES 2022.

About the Stadium: Lambeau Field is an outdoor athletic stadium that was constructed in 1957. It was first known as the “New City Stadium” after replacing the original city stadium at Green Bay East High School. In August 1965, however, it was renamed in memory of the Packers founder, player and head coach Curly Lambeau. With a seating capacity of 81,441, it is the third largest NFL stadium, and the largest venue in Wisconsin. The stadium has undergone numerous renovations over the years, the most recent of which was a $140.5 million renovation of the Atrium entrance. In 2018, the stadium became the first to use polypropylene-based SIS grass, which is still in use today. Lambeau Field is jointly owned by the City of Green Bay and the Stadium District, with the Packers’ lease being with both entities.

Fun Factoids: (1) We’ve chosen Lambeau Field as our Stadium of the Month because it will be the site of the Packers vs. Cowboys game which will take place on November 13, 2022. The stadium is also historic and iconic. (2) If you’re a Packers fan, you can show your Packers Pride, memorialize a loved one, or celebrate a special event by having a message displayed on a commemorative brick or tile installed at Lambeau Field. You can find more information about this neat service here. (3) The stadium has been nicknamed “The Frozen Tundra.” The nickname was garnered from the 1967 NFL Championship game between the Green Bay Packers and the Dallas Cowboys. The game is known as the “Ice Bowl” because it was played in temperatures of -15°F (-26 °C) with biting winds. (4) The venue has hosted many concerts, with notable performances including Billy Joel in June of 2017 and Paul McCartney in June 2019. (5) The Green Bay Packers are owned by their fans, who have the opportunity to buy shares each year.

The 50-cm Pléiades 1 High-Resolution Satellite Constellation

The Pléiades 1 constellation (or at least part of it!) has been in orbit since December 2011 and if you have not had a chance to check out any sample imagery, take a few moments and have a look at the gallery on our website. If you work with high-resolution imagery, you should consider Pléiades 1 and Pléiades Neo for your next geospatial projects.

A variety of Pléiades 1 products are available from both a well-established archive and as a new collection, including 50-centimeter (cm) pansharpened imagery and 50-cm panchromatic – 2-meter (m) 4-band multispectral bundles. We are happy to discuss the technical specifications, pricing and tasking options available with both of these satellite constellations.

The 30-cm Pléiades Neo High-Resolution Satellite Constellation

Pléiades Neo is our newest high-resolution satellite constellation. The first Neo satellite went up in April 2021 and the second in August of the same year. This 30-centimeter resolution constellation will add two more satellites in the next few months and upgrade from daily to intraday revisits. Pléiades Neo has six multispectral bands with 1.2-meter resolution, including a deep blue and two infrared bands, along with a 30-centimeter resolution panchromatic band.

The archive is growing every day, and the satellites are available for new collections, making Pléiades Neo the perfect solution for site monitoring. Check out our beautiful sample images in the Pléiades Neo gallery.

More sample images and technical information about Pléiades 1 can be found on our website here; while the same can be found here for the Pléiades Neo constellation.

The Apollo Mapping sales team can answer any questions you might have about Pléiades 1 and/or Pléiades Neo. We can be reached at (303) 993-3863 or [email protected].

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