Posted on November 5th, 2019

The Pléiades 1 – SPOT 6/7 Stadium of the Month – Bryant-Denny Stadium

In October we were at the site of an annual Big 12 football match up, and for this Pléiades 1SPOT 6/7 Stadium of the Month we move over to the SEC and check out a college football stadium that will be the site of a crucial November game, i.e. Bryant-Denny Stadium.



A 50-cm color image of Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA collected on November 10, 2018 (which also happens to be a gameday against Ole Miss where Alabama cruised to victory) by Pléiades 1A; and then a 1.5-m SPOT 7 image of the same college stadium collected on November 11, 2017. These images have custom processing and color balancing applied by Apollo Mapping. PLEIADES © CNES 2019, Distribution Airbus DS. SPOT © Airbus DS 2019.

About the Venue: Bryant-Denny Stadium sits on the west side of the University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa, about 0.75 miles (1.2 kilometers) south of the Black Warrior River. Opened in 1929 as Denny Stadium (in honor of former university president from 1912 to 1932, George Denny) with only 12,000 seats, since then the name has changed (to Bryant-Denny Stadium, adding in Paul Bryant who was their legendary coach from 1958 to 1982) and the stadium has expanded greatly to a current capacity of 101,821. With the recent success of the Alabama football team, it’s no surprise that another stadium expansion is planned for 2020 where concessions, scoreboards and seating will be improved.

Fun Factoids: (1) On November 9th, the long standing rivalry between the Louisiana State University Tigers and the University of Alabama Crimson Tide football teams renews for the 84th time. With both teams currently ranked in the Top 10 of NCAA Division I college football, this game is sure to live up to its billing. Alabama leads the series with LSU, holding a commanding 53-25-5 (wins-losses-ties) all-time record. (2) The seating capacity of Bryant-Denny Stadium has been changed 8 times (i.e. 1936, 1946, 1961, 1988, 1998, 2006 and 2010) with the largest change in 1998 where 13,695 seats were added. (3) The 2018 football season was only the 18th time Alabama played all of its home games at Bryant-Denny Stadium as from 1900 to 2003, they played at least one home game at Legion Field located in Birmingham.

The Pléiades 1 High-Resolution Satellite Constellation

The Pléiades 1 constellation (or at least part of it!) has been in orbit since December 2011 and if you have not had a chance to check out any sample imagery, take a few moments and have a look at the gallery on our website. If you work with high-resolution imagery, you should consider Pléiades 1 for your next geospatial project.

A variety of Pléiades 1 products are available from both a growing archive and as a new collection, including 50-centimeter (cm) pansharpened imagery and 50-cm panchromatic – 2-meter (m) 4-band multispectral bundles. We are happy to discuss the technical specifications, pricing and tasking options available with this satellite constellation.

The SPOT Medium-Resolution Satellite Constellation

The SPOT medium-resolution constellation consist of seven satellites launched from 1986 to 2014 with the most recent additions, SPOT 6 and SPOT 7, launching in 2012 and 2014 respectively. SPOT 6 and SPOT 7 are twin satellites offering 1.5-m panchromatic and 6-m 4-band multispectral data with a massive footprint at 60-kilometers (km) wide. For projects requiring recent archive coverage or rapid new collections of medium-resolution data, SPOT 6/7 should be one of your top imagery sources!

More sample images and technical information about Pléiades 1A and 1B can be found on our website here; while the same can be found here for the SPOT constellation and specifically about SPOT 6/7.

The Apollo Mapping sales team can answer any questions you might have about Pléiades 1 and/or any of the SPOT satellites. We can be reached at (303) 993-3863 or sales@apollomapping.com.

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