Posted on August 6th, 2019

The Pléiades 1 – SPOT 6/7 Stadium of the Month – Lord’s Cricket Ground

From a patriotic July edition of the Pléiades 1SPOT 6/7 Stadium of the Month where we toured a football field in our nation’s capital, for this month we travel across the ‘Pond’ with a stop at the site of an important cricket match (at least I think it’s important!), Lord’s Cricket Ground in London, England.

About the Venue: When you play any sport in a venue simply referred to as Lord’s, you know you are playing in a venue with steeped history. In fact, Lord’s Cricket Ground is often referred to at the Home of Cricket as its first cricket matches were played here in May 1787. While the current site of Lord’s is actually its third location in the greater London region, the first match at the 3rd location was still on July 19, 1818 making for over 200 years of cricket history. The cricket grounds are surrounded by nine different stands which together seat 28,000 fans. As many of the stands are twenty years or older now, redevelopment of Lord’s started in 2014 and will continue until 2021 without an interruption to matches.


A 50-cm color image of Lord’s Cricket Grounds in London, England collected on May 15, 2018 by Pléiades 1A; and then a 1.5-m SPOT 6 image of the same cricket grounds collected on September 2, 2018. These images have custom processing and color balancing applied by Apollo Mapping. PLEIADES © CNES 2019, Distribution Airbus DS. SPOT © Airbus DS 2019.

Fun Factoids: (1) As Americans we make no false pretenses that we understand the rules of cricket so please do excuse my ignorance here! Either way, The Ashes cricket tournament appears to be held (at least) every other year between England and Australia with the 2019 edition hosted by the British. The name, The Ashes, originated in August 1882 after the Aussies destroyed the English cricket team on the 29th of the month. The second test/match of The Ashes will be held at Lord’s from August 14th to the 18th. (2) Okay this is insane, the single player scoring record for Lord’s is 333 runs set by England’s Grahma Gooch against India in 1990 – I mean what, 333 runs??!?!?! (3) The southwest side of Lord’s is nearly 2.5 meters (about 7.5 feet) lower than the northwest side; a question to our cricket-fan readers, was this done on purpose??

The Pléiades 1 High-Resolution Satellite Constellation

The Pléiades 1 constellation (or at least part of it!) has been in orbit since December 2011 and if you have not had a chance to check out any sample imagery, take a few moments and have a look at the gallery on our website. If you work with high-resolution imagery, you should consider Pléiades 1 for your next geospatial project.

A variety of Pléiades 1 products are available from both a growing archive and as a new collection, including 50-centimeter (cm) pansharpened imagery and 50-cm panchromatic – 2-meter (m) 4-band multispectral bundles. We are happy to discuss the technical specifications, pricing and tasking options available with this satellite constellation.

The SPOT Medium-Resolution Satellite Constellation

The SPOT medium-resolution constellation consist of seven satellites launched from 1986 to 2014 with the most recent additions, SPOT 6 and SPOT 7, launching in 2012 and 2014 respectively. SPOT 6 and SPOT 7 are twin satellites offering 1.5-m panchromatic and 6-m 4-band multispectral data with a massive footprint at 60-kilometers (km) wide. For projects requiring recent archive coverage or rapid new collections of medium-resolution data, SPOT 6/7 should be one of your top imagery sources!

More sample images and technical information about Pléiades 1A and 1B can be found on our website here; while the same can be found here for the SPOT constellation and specifically about SPOT 6/7.

The Apollo Mapping sales team can answer any questions you might have about Pléiades 1 and/or any of the SPOT satellites. We can be reached at (303) 993-3863 or sales@apollomapping.com.

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