Tag Archives: North Korea

30-cm Color WorldView-3/4 Image of the Month – The US-North Korea June 2018 Summit

Posted on August 7th, 2018

Every time we look at WorldView-3 and WorldView-4 (WV3/4) imagery, we are blown away. And we hope you are equally impressed with the data! Last month we fittingly explored a colorful town in South Korea, and for the August WorldView-3/4 Image of the Month we feature an image of the Hotel Capella in Singapore – the site of the historic US-North Korea Summit in June 2018. And while we would have preferred to feature an image collected on the actual day of the summit, i.e. June 12th, that was a very cloudy day so we did the best we could! This 30-cm WorldView-4 image was collected over the site of the summit, the Hotel Capella in Singapore, on June 11th at about 11:36am. This image has been processed for improved color and clarity by Apollo Mapping. (Images Courtesy: DigitalGlobe) PLEASE NOTE: Effective May 2016, WorldView-3/4 prices dropped again! Are you interested in finding out more about these price drops? If so, send us an email at [email protected] WorldView-3 launched in late 2014 and WorldView-4 launched in late 2016; taken together they are the most advanced satellite constellation the commercial marketplace has ever had access to. Here are a few of … testContinue reading

Our Changing Landscape – Hamhung, North Korea

Posted on October 3rd, 2017

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 13 billion square kilometers of data. In August, we checked out the reemergence of an Irish island, and September, after a few months out of the country, we head back to North Korea with a look at an industrial city, Hamhung. Click on the image above to see an animation of 5-meter natural color RapidEye imagery collected over Hamhung, North Korea on August 9, 2009 and August 26, 2017. In these two images spaced about 8 years apart, you will see that not much has changed. From what we could see, the easiest way to spot the new buildings are the colored roofs – many of them either red or blue. Do you see some significant changes we missed? (Images Courtesy: Planet @ 2017) The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers daily revisits to every location on the planet with a huge footprint that is 77-km wide. The … testContinue reading

Our Changing Landscape – The Korean Demilitarized Zone

Posted on June 6th, 2017

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 10 billion square kilometers of data. For June’s Our Changing Landscape we stay on the Korean Peninsula, traveling south from Wonsan, a coastal ‘tourist destination,’ with a look at the ever-tense Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers daily revisits to every location on the planet with a huge footprint that is 77-km wide. The data is priced competitively with a starting cost of $1.28 per square kilometer for all five spectral bands – academics do receive discounts. RapidEye adds a fifth band, the red edge, to the ‘traditional’ multispectral set of blue, green, red and near-infrared (NIR). The additional spectral data in the red edge band allows users to extract more useful land ‘information’ than can be from traditional 4-band imagery sources. When RapidEye imagery is ordered as a Level 3A Orthorectified product, images from multiple dates are extremely well registered, making it … testContinue reading

Our Changing Landscape – Wonsan, North Korea

Posted on May 2nd, 2017

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 8 billion square kilometers of data. In April’s Our Changing Landscape we looked at a special economic zone in North Korea, and for this month, we stay in the shrouded nation with a look at Wonsan, a coastal ‘tourist’ destination. The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers daily revisits to every location on the planet with a huge footprint that is 77-km wide. The data is priced competitively with a starting cost of $1.28 per square kilometer for all five spectral bands – academics do receive discounts. RapidEye adds a fifth band, the red edge, to the ‘traditional’ multispectral set of blue, green, red and near-infrared (NIR). The additional spectral data in the red edge band allows users to extract more useful land ‘information’ than can be from traditional 4-band imagery sources. When RapidEye imagery is ordered as a Level 3A Orthorectified product, images from multiple dates are … testContinue reading

30-cm Color WorldView-3 Image of the Month – Toronto, Canada

Posted on May 2nd, 2017

Toronto, Canada is one of the world’s most diverse cities, with more than 49% of the city comprised of minorities. In these four 30-cm images collected by WorldView-3 on July 11, 2015, you can see some of the city’s most frequented sites, for example CN Tower and BMO Field. These images have been processed by Apollo Mapping for improved colors and clarity. (Images Courtesy: DigitalGlobe) Every time we look at WorldView-3 (WV3) imagery, we are blown away. And we hope you are equally impressed with the data! In April, we found ourselves in the mysterious nation of North Korea for the WorldView-3 Image of the Month, and now in May we head to our friendly neighbor to the north for a look at Toronto, Canada. PLEASE NOTE: Effective May 2016, WorldView-3 prices dropped again! Are you interested in finding out more about these price drops? If so, send us an email at [email protected] WorldView-3 launched in late 2014 and it is the most advanced satellite the commercial marketplace has ever had access to. Here are a few of the features that really set it apart from the competition: Improved Resolution Higher resolution means you can see more detail in WV3 … testContinue reading

30-cm Color WorldView-3 Image of the Month – Pyongyang, North Korea

Posted on April 4th, 2017

Shrouded in secrecy, the capital city of Pyongyang is a mix of ornate buildings and parks surrounded by worn down homes and other structures. In the five images above, we start with a picture of the abandoned Hotel of Doom which looks like something out of a Star Wars movie. The next image features the Pyongyang Ice Rink which you might mistake for a religious temple if you did not know otherwise. The following WV3 images show an unused but ornate park; interesting spiral towers; and the active smoke stacks of an industrial zone. This 30-cm color WorldView-3 image was collected on May 24, 2015 and has been processed by Apollo Mapping for improved colors and clarity. (Images Courtesy: DigitalGlobe) Every time we look at WorldView-3 (WV3) imagery, we are blown away. And we hope you are equally impressed with the data! Last month we featured an ancient city along the Mediterranean, and for this WorldView-3 Image of the Month we move to the capital of the one of the world’s most infamous countries, Pyongyang in North Korea. PLEASE NOTE: Effective May 2016, WorldView-3 prices dropped again! Are you interested in finding out more about these price drops? If so, … testContinue reading

Our Changing Landscape – Rason Economic and Trade Zone, North Korea

Posted on April 4th, 2017

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 8 billion square kilometers of data. In March’s Our Changing Landscape we focused on a rapidly growing city in China, and in April we move to one of China’s mysterious neighbors, North Korea, with a look at the growth of the Rason Economic and Trade Zone. The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers daily revisits to every location on the planet with a huge footprint that is 77-km wide. The data is priced competitively with a starting cost of $1.28 per square kilometer for all five spectral bands – academics do receive discounts. RapidEye adds a fifth band, the red edge, to the ‘traditional’ multispectral set of blue, green, red and near-infrared (NIR). The additional spectral data in the red edge band allows users to extract more useful land ‘information’ than can be from traditional 4-band imagery sources. When RapidEye imagery is ordered as a Level 3A Orthorectified … testContinue reading

The Pléiades 1 Stadium of the Month – Rungrado May Day Stadium

Posted on April 7th, 2015

Change is good! So in honor of this simple theme, we switch up the focus of this article from golf courses to the Pléiades 1 Stadium of the Month. We will also change the format of this article slightly into a list of information about each stadium to accompany the monthly 50-cm Pléiades 1 image. Without further delay, let’s jump into our first stadium of the month, Rungrado May Day Stadium. Name & Its Origin: Rungrado May Day Stadium. Part of this stadium’s name is taken from the island it is located on, Rungra Island, which is surrounded by the Taedong River. And the rest of the name, May Day, comes from the international holiday that celebrates labor and is commonly celebrated in Communist nations. Location: Rungrado is located in the heart of Pyongyang, North Korea which is the country’s largest city as well as its capital. The stadium sits on the north side of a 1.3 square kilometer land mass in the middle of the Taedong River, Rungra Island. Taedong River has its headwaters in the Rangirm Mountains, flowing some 439 kilometers southwest into the Korea Bay. Rungrado May Day Stadium is located about 61 meters above sea level. … testContinue reading

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