Tag Archives: volcano

Our Changing Landscape – Mount Yasur, Vanuatu

Posted on October 2nd, 2018

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with a time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 14 billion square kilometers of data. In September we found ourselves in Japan looking at a series of recent eruptions on Mount Ontake, and for this Our Changing Landscape we stick with the volcano theme, focusing this time on Mount Yasur, Vanuatu. Click on the image above to see an animation of 5-meter natural color RapidEye imagery collected over Mount Yasur on March 21, 2011, January 21, 2013, February 18, 2015 and June 22, 2016. As has been the trend with these volcano articles, the four images here have smoke rising out of the calderas which makes color balancing the images properly nearly impossible. But regardless, if you check out the internal caldera, you can certainly see changes in its shape and dimensions from 2011 to 2016. All things said, some pretty neat images here! (Images Courtesy: © Planet 2018) The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers … testContinue reading

Our Changing Landscape – Mount Ontake, Japan

Posted on September 4th, 2018

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with a time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 14 billion square kilometers of data. Last month we checked out rapidly shrinking glaciers in the northwest of the United States, and for the September Our Changing Landscape we travel around the world to check out changes to a recently active volcano in Japan, Mount Ontake. Click on the image above to see an animation of 5-meter natural color RapidEye imagery collected over Mount Ontake on September 29, 2013, October 19, 2014 and October 15, 2016. First, we apologize for the 2014 image as given the very bright smoke plume over the caldera, it was impossible to brighten up the surrounding area so it is quite a dark image. In the three images you will see two major changes – first a significant reduction in tree cover from 2013 to 2016; and second, some small changes to the caldera and surrounding geology. Admittedly, we expected to see more significant changes in the shape of the caldera! (Images Courtesy: © Planet 2018) The RapidEye Constellation … testContinue reading

Our Changing Landscape – The Eruption of Mount Sinabung

Posted on July 10th, 2018

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with a time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 14 billion square kilometers of data. Last month we had another swing and a miss when we looked at the bloom of wildflowers in Texas, but we are hoping for better luck in July where we will check out the multiple volcanic eruptions of Mount Sinabung, Indonesia. The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers daily revisits to every location on the planet with a huge footprint that is 77-km wide. The data is priced competitively with a starting cost of $1.28 per square kilometer for all five spectral bands – academics do receive discounts. RapidEye adds a fifth band, the red edge, to the ‘traditional’ multispectral set of blue, green, red and near-infrared (NIR). The additional spectral data in the red edge band allows users to extract more useful land ‘information’ than can be from traditional 4-band imagery sources. When RapidEye imagery is ordered as a Level … testContinue reading

Your Imagery Work Break – Bogoslof Island Eruption May 2017

Posted on November 7th, 2017

(Images Courtesy: DigitalGlobe. Processed by Apollo Mapping for improved color accuracy and clarity.) We love maps. We love imagery. We love work breaks. We hope you like them as well! Wow is it November already? Sadly it is, so winter is right around the corner meaning you need to get outside now to enjoy the last vestiges of fall weather! But before you head out, take a few moments to gander these two images of a volcanic eruption on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. These 30-centimeter color WorldView-3 images were collected on May 28, 2017 on the exact day the eruption started, how lucky is that?! Two images have been added for this Your Imagery Work Break as the area covered by the smoke plume is quite massive and so is the full resolution image at just over 400 megabytes. The first image is a resampled view of the entire plume; while the second zoomed-in, full-resolution image shows the amazing vertical structure of these ash clouds – enjoy! Have a great rest of your workday!

Our Changing Landscape – Mount Tongariro, New Zealand

Posted on December 2nd, 2014

In this monthly feature, we span the globe to examine Our Changing Landscape with time series of medium resolution RapidEye satellite imagery. The RapidEye archive dates back to late 2008 and already contains more than 5 billion square kilometers of data. This month, we look at changes in the landscape around Mount Tongariro, New Zealand following two 2012 eruptions. The RapidEye Constellation RapidEye is a constellation of five 5-meter medium resolution satellites each offering five spectral bands of information. The RapidEye constellation offers daily revisits to every location on the planet with a huge footprint that is 77-km wide. The data is priced competitively with a starting cost of $1.28 per square kilometer for all five spectral bands – academics do receive discounts. RapidEye adds a fifth band, the red edge, to the ‘traditional’ multispectral set of blue, green, red and near-infrared (NIR). The additional spectral data in the red edge band allows users to extract more useful land ‘information’ than can be from traditional 4-band imagery sources. When RapidEye imagery is ordered as a Level 3A Orthorectified product, images from multiple dates are extremely well registered, making it the ideal data source for Our Changing Landscape. Click on the … testContinue reading

Small World – Quito, Ecuador

Posted on December 3rd, 2013

Ecuador is known for many things, and the Galapagos Islands are probably high on that list. Sitting roughly 600 miles west of Ecuador in the Pacific Ocean, the Islands make up a portion of a national park and biological marine reserve. While not a native Ecuadorian, perhaps one of the most famous names associated with the Islands is that of Charles Darwin. A research expedition in 1835 aboard the HMS Beagle gave Darwin the opportunity for biological studies that were integral to his understanding of natural selection and ultimately appeared in his game-changing book, The Origin of Species. But never fear, the mainland is known for its natural reserves as well, for example the volcanic formations that tourists flock to every year. The lush foliage on Pichincha masks the fact that it is an active stratovolcano (a conical volcano built on many layers of ash, hardened lava and pumice), but that doesn’t keep the tourists away. Image captured by the 50-cm satellite, WorldView-2 (WV2) on November 17, 2012, and appears courtesy of DigitalGlobe. Photo enhanced by Apollo Mapping. The trail down from Pichincha on the Eastern slopes to Quito, the capital city of Ecuador. Image captured by WV2 on November … testContinue reading

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